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News Recognition for Stoner

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Professor honored for her work with students, support for diversity
Group working on a diorama

Joyce Hill Stoner, center front, works with students on the conservation of a diorama during the 2017 TIP-C program. At far left is Matthew Fields, then a student at the University of Arkansas, who presented a tribute to Stoner at the Dec. 7 Alliance of HBCU Museums and Galleries diversity conference.

Joyce Hill Stoner, the Rosenberg Professor in Material Culture and professor of art conservation at the University of Delaware, has been honored for her dedication to students from historically black colleges and universities (HBCU).

The Alliance of HBCU Museums and Galleries presented a plaque to Stoner at its Dec. 7 annual diversity conference, hosted by the Winterthur/UD Program in Art Conservation. It was the alliance's first award of its kind.

Alliance leaders called Stoner "a model of equity and inclusion" and cited "her unselfishness, summer after summer" in working with students from HBCUs who come to Delaware for the Two-Week Introduction to Practical Conservation (TIP-C) program.

The summer program is designed to showcase the field of art conservation to promising students from groups that are underrepresented in the profession. Participants spend time in UD classrooms and the conservation labs at Winterthur Museum, where they learn conservation practices and use those techniques to work on projects.

Also at the diversity conference, former TIP-C student Matthew Fields, a fine arts major at the University of Arkansas, offered a tribute to Stoner via an audio recording.

“Your work toward diversity and inclusion was a game changer for my educational environment and experience, and I know it was for others as well,” Fields said. It was his participation in TIP-C in 2017 that gave him the background and connections to work as a conservation intern the following summer at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, he said.

“Without inspirational mentors like Dr. Stoner, I would not have been introduced to the world of museum studies,” Fields said.

Stoner is the Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor in Material Culture and director of the Preservation Studies Doctoral Program at UD and a paintings conservator in the Winterthur/UD Program in Art Conservation.

She has written more than 120 articles or book chapters and co-edited a multi-author 890-page Routledge book, The Conservation of Easel Paintings. She has carried out conservation treatments for the Freer Gallery of Art, Colonial Williamsburg, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Brandywine River Museum, the Wyeth family and various private collectors.

Article by Ann Manser; photo by Evan Krape

Published Dec. 18, 2019

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Joyce Hill Stoner has received an award for her work with students in a program designed to diversify participation in the field of art conservation.

​Joyce Hill Stoner has received an award for her work with students in a program designed to diversify professional participation in the field of art conservation.

12/18/2019
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Recognition for Stoner